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Shelterpop

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    The mega online retailer charts out how you can shop for an entire dorm room for under $300 on the site.

    In just a blink of an eye, back-to-school season (and regular work hours) is nearly upon us. And one of our favorite online retailer eBay is already way ahead of the game for the back-to-school shopping hurdle. They've specifically taken a closer look at dorm room decorating. This infographic chart shows how the furnishings in an entire dorm room, from hang racks to a bed, can all be found and bought for under $300 on eBay. Check out the magnified chart here.


    eBay shopping back-to-schoolCourtesy of eBay


     

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    Don't have time to browse all the online sample sales everyday? You're in luck: We searched them all and brought back the best.

    Editor's Pick:
    Leila distressed nesting tables by Safavieh, $219, One Kings Lane.

    This trio of beautifully distressed nesting tables will lend a vintage air to a sitting area anchored with a large sofa. With their blue-painted wood tops and white metal bases, the colors and distressed look exude French country charm.

    Want to snap this up? Move quickly. Sale ends Sunday, 11am.

    Check back tomorrow for the next Daily Sampling!

     

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    Here's a tip that makes complete sense after some consideration. Clean the soap scum, mildew and dirt in grouts with a toothbrush and toothpaste. A reader had pointed this out to us on Facebook and we simply had to give it a go.

    Simply scrub the grout as if you're brushing your teeth. An extra-firm brush and whitening toothpaste work best in taking out the dirt and grime and giving grouts that extra polish. And if you're willing to splurge a little, an electric toothbrush works miracles on grouts and also saves you a lot of arm motions and scrubbing.


    Have a cleaning tip to share? Let us know at Twitter.com/ShelterPop.

    Daily Clean-Up tipsChiot's Run, Flickr

     

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  • 08/19/11--06:47: Decorating With Purple
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    Dare to flirt with the many shades of this tantalizing hue.


    Check out this amazing color story by our friends over at Real Simple!




    From lavender to plum, the range of this color is as wide as its appeal.


    Purple 101
    There's a reason purple is associated with royalty: In ancient times, the dye was extracted from mollusks and therefore insanely expensive. Now deep versions of the color still signal luxury, while softer takes are famously soothing (think yoga studio). New York City interior designer Jamie Drake, who has used a vast range of purples during his long career, says a powerful purple piece "can add passion to a room" and will really pop when set against a complementary background color, like green. For a pulled-together look, repeat the purple elsewhere in the room. This makes the overall statement thoughtfully eclectic, rather than just eccentric.

    Dark Purples
    The deepest purples, like aubergines and brooding blue-tinted shades, imply grandeur and strike a serious, formal note. These tones are best used boldly, with commitment. Advises Elizabeth Bauer, New York City interior designer and purple advocate: "To make them work, do something major, like all four walls or a set of built-ins." But go a few tones lighter, and even dark purples will make gathering spaces seem cozy and conversation-friendly. Bauer shares a few of her favorite shades.


    To see 20 more ways to decorate with the many shades of purple, head over to Real Simple.


    Also don't miss these great reads:
    Transform A Corner Of Your Home
    How To Save On Home Repairs
    Color Combinations For Your Home

     

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    Day and night converge in this photographer's powerful and stunning images.

    Photographer Stephen Wilkes' Day to Night images are mesmerizing and awe-inspiring to say the least. Wilkes' photos succinctly capture the frenzied, people-packed streets of New York City and the fleeting moments of the everyday. Wilkes photographs continuously from a fixed camera angle for up to 15 hours and then selects a number of images that are digitally blended into the final photo showing the transition from day to night. We love the juxtaposition of light and dark and the idea of merging two seemingly very different worlds. But more than anything, this is Wilkes' Manhattan--bustling and always changing--and he has succeeded in capturing it all in one frame, day and night.

    If you're in New York the coming months, Wilkes' photos will be on view at the exhibition "Day to Night" at CLAMPART gallery from September 8 through October 29.

     

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    Don't have time to browse all the online sample sales everyday? You're in luck: We searched them all and brought back the best.

    Editor's Pick:
    Tribeca wood jars with white finial lids, $42-$105, The Foundary.

    We love everything about these simple yet pretty wood jars, from the beautiful wood grain to the turned bases to the white finial lids. The natural look of these wood jars will go nicely on a console alongside a mirror or grouped together as a centerpiece on a coffee table.

    Want to snap this up? Move quickly. Sale ends Monday at midnight.

    Check back tomorrow for the next Daily Sampling!

     

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    Combining our obsession with interiors with our love of fashion into a shoppable room.

    This Weekend's Pick: Anne Hathaway

    At the recent One Day premiere, Anne Hathaway stepped out on to the red carpet in a sophisticated black dress with lacing and gold embroidered details along with gold heels. Girly but elegant, Anne's look caught our eye and prompted us to conjure an high-style bedroom for her that has ample gold and glamour.

    Anne Hathaway One Day actress roomMichael Loccisano/WireImage


    And you can get the look in your home with these products:

    Clockwise from top left:
    Florentine Smoke chandelier, $3,295, Jayson Home & Garden.
    French Honeycomb mirror, $289, Wisteria.
    Dawning Lark bed, $2,198, Anthropologie.
    Woven antiqued gold-leafing side tables, $559 each, Horchow.


    And if you haven't yet, head over to see this week's Well-Suited Room inspired by our favorite best dressed men.

     

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    You've seen our Fashionable Room column where we look to some of the best-dressed starlets for decor inspiration. Now we're turning to the best-groomed men for some pointers.

    This Weekend's Pick: Jim Sturgess

    Actor Jim Sturgess, who plays the leading man to Anne Hathaway in the new movie One Day, walked down the red carpet at the film's premiere sporting a coolly casual yet very dapper look. The gray three-piece suit is definitely sleek but we like how Jim didn't go full on formal with a tie. We took his look and came up with a laid-back sitting room that we think will get his stamp of approval.

    Jim Sturgess One Day ActorMichael Loccisano/WireImage


    And you can get the look in your home with these products:

    Clockwise from top left:
    Rock pendant, $925, ABC Carpet & Home.
    20x200 Carol Padberg wall art, $129, West Elm.
    Louis chair, $899, Room & Board.
    Pi coffee table, $599, Blu Dot.

     

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    Getting to know the faces and stories behind our favorite gardens. Today: Horticulturist Mimi Jorling.


    Horticulturist, Mimi Jorling. Photo: Marie Viljoen


    Mimi Jorling has been a horticulturist for over 15 years, working in residential gardens, botanical gardens, and public parks. She is currently responsible for the plantings in Chelsea Cove, Segment 5 of the Hudson River Park in New York City, designed by Michael Van Valkenburgh and Associates. We chatted in the entry garden designed by Lynden B. Miller which opened to the public in 2010. Mimi holds a certificate in horticulture from the Brooklyn Botanic Garden.


    1. Why do you garden?
    I garden for therapy. I grew up in rural areas. In New York City being in - literal - contact with the earth and sky is important. I get comments from people every day, who thank me for the plantings. When they are in a garden they realize what a restorative effect it has. Making that space for other people is very rewarding. And being able to control your surroundings in a chaotic world feels good. I was freaked out about something once when I lived in Denver, so I went out and bought some marigolds and then planted them in this very strict arc! Afterwards I felt better: "OK, everything's in control..."


    2. Who or what inspired you to garden?
    My dad had a vegetable garden and my mom a flower garden. They did not think of themselves as gardeners but were really excited about their garden projects: "Look! The zucchini worked!"

    3. What was the first plant you grew?
    A peanut. We had this peanut growing kit: A plastic cup, some red yarn, and we grew a peanut plant. They sprout really easily.

    4. How often do you garden?
    Monday to Friday, 7am till 3.30pm. Weather has no effect on my schedule. In winter it might be 10'F out with 30 mile-per-hour winds off the Hudson, and I'm out here.

    5. What is your garden's USDA zone?
    New York City is in USDA Zone 6b, but this is a microclimate. It is exposed and the wind in winter off the water is very cold.

    6. What size is the garden and park you take care of?
    Segment 5 runs from West 22nd Street to West 28th Street and is part of the five-and-a-half mile long waterfront park between the Hudson River and the eight-lane West Side highway.

    Chelsea Cove's entry garden. Photo Marie Viljoen


    7. What plant has most disappointed you?
    I don't think I've ever been disappointed by a plant!

    8. What plant has made you happiest?
    In this garden, the crepe myrtle. Its bark, flowers and form. It's been blooming now for six weeks. My favorite plant is echinops. I love how it glows, as though illuminated, and it's just so spiky and alive-looking.

    9. What do you love about your garden right now?
    The river. People forget that it is a garden element. I worked beside the river in Battery Park for seven years and I would have a hard time working in Central Park or Prospect Park. The river adds so much. You can breathe, there is movement and openness.

    10. What do you feed your garden?
    I use compost, but unfortunately we don't make our own. A garbage service hauls away our woody and herbaceous debris. I don't know what the difficulty is in having the truck haul it to a composting site rather than the landfill but I have met with much resistance when repeatedly suggesting that. Our compost is ordered and I apply a lot in the spring and in fall. The soil here is very sandy and water just runs straight through. I mix mulch with compost, too, to help improve the soil.

    11. What would you like to grow, that you can't?
    The first thing that comes to mind is a lime tree so I could make fresh limeade on demand - inspired by Haitians who make delicious limeade and also use limes in a lot of their cooking. Through the Haitian dance I began studying about 15 years ago, I have learned about Haitian culture. After the earthquake last year, I felt I had to go to Haiti and try to help the people, in whatever way I could, who have added such richness to my life through dance and music. I am currently working with a Haitian friend to build a Haitian-run school there. My contribution to the curriculum will be establishing a food garden and hopefully an ornamental garden as well. Or an ornamental food garden!

    12. Food, flowers, native or ornamental?
    Hm. I think that because of my experience gardening in Colorado, and two very hot summers here (I moved back to NYC last June), I'd say anything drought resistant. The more drought resistant the better. In Colorado people have lawns but the front yard of the house I still have there is amazing and is all perennials. People stop and look. It is very low maintenance and drought tolerant. I have a renter in the house and told him to at least keep the shrubs alive. I haven't seen the garden since June 2010.

    13. Most inspiring garden writer, thinker, blogger, personality?
    [British conceptual landscape artist] Andy Goldsworthy spends time within a natural landscape before creating anything, in order to understand it. I think that is how gardens should be designed. I love the movie about his work, Rivers and Tides.

    14. What plants do you dislike?
    Euonymous. At the moment a creeping form (Euonymous fortunei) is affecting the crabapples - I think - and we can't access the soil to pick up diseased crabapple leaves or to fertilize the trees. It's not the euonymous' fault but I do hate euonymous

    Spirea, catmint, barberry and fall anemones in Chelsea Cove's entry garden. Photo Marie Viljoen


    15. Would you like more sun or more shade?
    I don't mind sun but this garden is very hot with very little shade. Some of the plants used in the design are for shade: hostas, heuchera, bergenia. Because the soil is also sandy it does not retain water and they suffer and burn. I am researching drought tolerant plants, like a blue penstemon, and many are only available out West. The flower colors in the entry garden here are primary - red, yellow and blue. When I wondered why, Lynden Miller explained that she hated the huge [Chelsea Piers] building south of us, which has these colors in it, and that she used them in the design to try and disguise it!

    16. Where is your favorite public garden?
    It's not a garden but I love the woody area of Prospect Park, Brooklyn. It sounds corny, I know, but it is nature's garden. Being in the city, it is very refreshing. There are some big trees! There are big trees in Central Park but not within woodland. I love it.

    Read more about the entry garden and the rest of my conversation with Mimi at 66 Square Feet.

     

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    Cleaning your silverware and accessories--whether it's a fork or jewelry or a pitcher or a vase--ensures that they keep their shine. Lack of cleaning and maintenance can quickly lead silver pieces to dulling and tarnish.

    A great way to polish silver and keep it clean is to use toothpaste. However, make sure that it is actually toothpaste that is in paste form and not gel form. To start, don't wear rubber gloves because rubber erodes silver. Then just be sure that you try out the toothpaste on a hidden area of an inexpensive silver piece, just to make sure that it cleans correctly. Polish the silver gently back and forth to avoid damaging the surface, and simply watch the silver regain its gleaming look.

    Have a cleaning tip to share? Let us know at Twitter.com/ShelterPop.

    Daily Clean-Up tipsChiot's Run, Flickr

     

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    This new concept store by the retailer Nordstrom donates 100% of its profits to charities in New York.

    Last Friday was the official opening date of Treasure & Bond, a loft-like lifestyle store by the Seattle-based retailer Nordstrom. We scoped out the shop and quickly understood why it's being applauded by Manhattanites all over. Stocked with clothing and home accessories by brands such as Rogan, James Perse, and Thomaspaul, it didn't take much to convince us that it's worth multiple return visits. But most importantly, Treasure & Bond donates 100% of its profits to charities that help children around New York. Check out the shop here.

    Treasure and Bond shop Courtesy of Treasure & Bond

     

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    Don't have time to browse all the online sample sales everyday? You're in luck: We searched them all and brought back the best.

    Editor's Pick:
    Yellow Pages desk stationery set by Poppin, $32.35, Fab.com.



    With back-to-school and -work hours creeping up on us, we're thinking we need a fresh start with the fall season (even if it's almost the end of the year). This stationery set has exactly what we're looking for--practical tools, affordability, and great design that makes it easy on the eyes.

    Want to snap this up? Move quickly. Sale ends Thursday, 10am.

    Check back tomorrow for the next Daily Sampling!

     

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  • 08/22/11--12:47: Home Remedy: Be Adventurous
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    Four designers offer their expertise on how your home can help you break out of your routine habits and inspire you to try new things.

    This week as we look at how your home can help solve your problems we're exploring how it can encourage you to be a little more adventurous in your day-to-day and decorating at home. We reached out to the New York Design Center's new Access to Design designers to get their thoughts and tips on how your home can inspire you to go out on a limb and try new things at your place. (You can also get great advice and find a designer at accesstodesign@nydc.com.)


    Kevin Isbell of Kevin Isbell Interiors believes in mixing styles and lots of personality.
    "Think outside the box! There is nothing worse than seeing your home look as if a truck from an online retailer just dropped everything at your front door. It's boring, safe, and totally uninspired. Mix it up a bit. Fill your home with things you love and express who you are and you will create a home that is uniquely your own."


    Vanessa Deleon Associates NYDCCourtesy of Vanessa Deleon


    Vanessa Deleon of Vanessa Deleon Associates suggests creating a space that stimulates your senses and your mind.
    "The idea for this room was to create a unique lounge where people could escape from their daily routines and relish in rare and exotic items like fine cigars and exclusive wines and cognacs. A space like this filled with all these goodies will make one feel overwhelmed with excitement and curiosity."


    Courtesy of Richard Lee Interior Design



    Richard Lee of Richard Lee Interior Design recommends using your home as a lab for design experiments.
    "Designers are usually more experimental. And designers do things for themselves they might not do for clients, like painting their walls black. So your home can kind of be like a laboratory--a design laboratory."


    A pair of candelabra from the Laserow Antiques showroom.


    Liza Laserow of Laserow Antiques and Interior Design suggests adding elements of surprise throughout.
    "Let the expected meet the unexpected: Place a pair of dramatic 18th-century gilt bronze candelabras in your bathroom to light when taking a bubble bath!"


    Looking for more tips on how to stay healthy indoors? Check out our previous Home Remedies on How To Get Creative, How To Be Productive, and How To Destress After Work.

     

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    We've discovered that shaving cream is another hygienic product that works miracles when cleaning. Squirt a little shaving cream on a small bit of dirty grouting and rub the grout with a dry washcloth. Then just simply wipe and rinse away. Just remember, shaving cream grows and expands quickly so apply only a small amount.

    Have a cleaning tip to share? Let us know at Twitter.com/ShelterPop.

    Daily Clean-Up tipsChiot's Run, Flickr

     

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    Take a peek inside the spaces where some of today's authors write, ponder, and procrastinate. This week: Die Buying author Laura DiSilverio's office, which has and continues to inspire her as a writer.

    When I retired from the Air Force in 2004 determined to write and publish novels, my lovely husband surprised me with a desk and bookshelves to convert a small bedroom into my private office. He called it an investment in his future as "a man of leisure living off his wife's earnings." Seven years into my writing career, he still has to put in a 40+ hour work week with the Defense Intelligence Agency, but he has a much more fulfilled wife which, he says, makes it all worthwhile. (See why I married him?)

    I have nothing but respect for writers who can practice their craft in stray slices of time stolen in vans during kids' lacrosse practices or in doctors' waiting rooms, or hiding in a restroom stall with a laptop while they're supposed to be working. I'm not one of them. Especially when I'm drafting, I need a serene environment: no soap opera or Judge Judy in the background, no Mozart concerto or Queen blaring from the stereo, no quarreling offspring in the hall.

    Laura DiSilverioCourtesy of author


    Laura DiSilverioCourtesy of author


    So, my office is perfect, at least when school is in session. On the second floor of our Colorado Springs home, it offers a view of Pikes Peak most of the year and of peacefully swaying aspen and cottonwood limbs during the summer. Yellow walls add a bit of wake-me-up color, no matter how gray the day may be outside. Books abound. I have a full shelf of writing reference books and many, many shelves of books that have meant something to me or inspired me in one way or another.

    A few mementoes of my Air Force career hang behind me (apropos, no?). The other walls display my girls' artistic efforts attached with magnets-Did you know you can buy magnetic paint to go under regular wall paint?-and artwork that my husband and I have purchased. On our first anniversary, we decided to buy a piece of art together each year, rather than gift each other with lingerie or easily broken gadgets, and we've kept to that tradition. I have two of our anniversary pieces hanging over my desk where they remind me of special times with my hubby.

    On my desk, photos of my family cheer me on. Notebooks with scribblings on works in progress, or manuscripts awaiting revising or editing clutter my desk more than I like, but I live with it. One of the most important items, a 5x7 framed photo of a sailboat from one of those rah-rah motivational posters catalogs says, "Risk: You cannot discover new oceans unless you have the courage to lose sight of the shore." That philosophy took me to Bangkok as a young lieutenant to help with the search for POWs still missing from the Vietnam conflict, goaded me to interview for a job creating and editing a safety magazine, and sustained me as I made the transition from a military career that offered a healthy paycheck and plenty of recognition, to a writer's life of uncertain remuneration-I'm still waiting for the day when my hourly wage has a figure to the left of the decimal-buckets of rejection, and little extrinsic reward. I'm immensely grateful for all those experiences.

    When I'm not drafting a new novel, when I'm revising, or copy-editing, I move my base of operations. I don't know why. Somehow, a change of scenery helps. When the weather's nice, I take the hard copy manuscript and a pen outside on the deck so I can enjoy the fuchsia, marigolds and daisies and be buzzed by hummingbirds seeking nectar. On rarer occasions, I feel the need for a livelier scene to stimulate my creativity, so I head for my local Panera and set up camp for a morning or two with a cup of tea. Many a character description has come from unwary latte swillers with a distinctive chin, gesture, or gait.

    One final word about what my office gives me. It has, from the get-go, made me feel like a professional writer. Before my first $25 sale of a short essay to an ezine, before my first three-book contract, back when people assumed I could bake cookies for the first grade Halloween party/chaperone a field trip/babysit/shuttle them to the airport because I was "only" a writer, I knew I was a professional. I had an office of my own, and that conferred a certain gravitas, at least in my own mind. (Let me hasten to add that I don't mean to imply that any writer without the luxury of an office isn't professional; I'm saying that it boosted my self-confidence.) Furniture, computer, desk chair-a couple thou. World beater attitude-priceless.

    Who knows? Maybe if I spend enough time in my office my husband will get to be the golfing, chess playing man of leisure he set out to become when he invested in where I write.

    Laura DiSilverioPortrait: Carly Mitchell


    Laura DiSilverio spent twenty years as an Air Force intelligence officer before retiring in Colorado with her husband, two daughters, and a dog. Die Buying, the first in her Mall Cop Mystery series, released this month, and profits from the book sales are donated to the Wounded Warrior Project. For more information, please visit: www.lauradisilverio.com.

     

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  • 08/23/11--07:37: Stunning Modern Prefab Homes
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    Prefab homes, houses that are built offsite, are becoming more and more popular and gaining momentum with people around the world.


    Check out this roundup of stunning prefab homes by our friends at CasaSugar!


    h&m home


    Prefab used to be a dirty word, but no longer: architects, most notably Dutch and Spanish architects, are leading the cause of modern prefab building, according to Arch-Vision, a European market research company. A recent international research study of 1,200 architects noted that 88 percent of Dutch and 83 percent of Spanish architects indicate that they can create attractive architectural designs through prefab, with most architects from other surveyed countries in agreement. This is an increase over last year's research results.


    Here in the US, I've been following prefab trends since I first edited an article about Michelle Kaufmann's Breezehouse six years ago. Now, there are a number of gorgeous prefab companies featuring eco, modern kit homes. Want to see some of my current favorites? Come take a closer look.


    See the more of these modern prefab houses over at CasaSugar!

    Also don't miss these stories!
    DIY Abstract Art
    Rope Decor
    Star Home Decor

     

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    OK, I admit it: Fabric care labels are hard things to get excited about. I rarely give anything but a passing glance to them...until I shrunk a cotton dress that I thought would be machine washable.

    Though I definitely save on dry cleaning costs with this devil-may-care route initially, there comes a time when the inevitable "Whoops" moment happens...usually with one of the pricier garments in the closet. And I'm not alone. From the ShelterPop inbox, the top 3 "Whoops" laundry mistake moments that can be avoided by just reading the label are:

    - Dresses turning into sacks. Bagged-out pleats and warped hemlines originate from being casually tossed into a dryer when the garment should've been line dried. Oops.
    - Accidental reverse tie-dye. Some garments are so close to white that it's easy to say "Let's just throw some bleach in there." And that's when we discover that a white dress was actually ivory. Or bone. Or any other color that's "not white." Now it has a Jackson Pollock-like smattering of bleached blotches.
    - Melting fabric. This is from ironing a garment that felt like a natural fiber, but was actually a wonder of science, shot with synthetics. Or completely synthetic. At least it was, before it melted on your ironing board.

    So, I get it. We all should read the label. But get this...new labeling guidelines are now coming into effect, where symbols replace text instructions. While some of them are easy (like an iron with an "X" through it), there are some downright strange ones (like a circle-in-a-square).

    To bring us up to speed on what means "wash" and what means "dry clean only," I've called upon Jonathan Scheer, President and CEO of the high-end textile restoration company J.Scheer & Co. The go-to textile and stain expert for everyone from Madonna to Sotheby's, you might remember him ingeniously removing a lipstick stain in our last exclusive video.



    Want to see the master at work, removing a seemingly impossible stain from a white shirt without resorting to pro-level products? Then check out...
    Stain Removal 101: Lipstick Stains

     

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    Don't have time to browse all the online sample sales everyday? You're in luck: We searched them all and brought back the best.

    Editor's Pick:
    Legare wire barstool, $100, The Foundary.

    Made of chrome, this wire barstool pays homage to the modern chairs designed by the chairs designed by the renowned Italian designer Harry Bertoia. It's a lot more comfortable than it looks, actually, and can see a pair of these pulled up along a bar or on either sides of a tall and round breakfast table.


    Want to snap this up? Move quickly. Sale ends Friday, 12am.

    Check back tomorrow for the next Daily Sampling!

     

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    With dishes and all the food washing that goes on inside dishwashers, grime might not be immediately visible to the naked eye but it's definitely there if not cleaned regularly. Eradicate soap scum and unpleasant odors from the dishwasher by pouring one cup of distilled white vinegar inside an empty machine and run it through one rinse cycle. Make sure to do this once a month to keep it clean and fresh.

    Have a cleaning tip to share? Let us know at Twitter.com/ShelterPop.

    Daily Clean-Up tipsChiot's Run, Flickr

     

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    We've long admired interior designer Deborah Wecselman's impeccable sense of style and approach to the eclectic. Her designs are sophisticated yet edgy, but altogether liveable-a tough balance to pull off when decorating in the eclectic style. Here's how she does it, and how you can borrow her secrets for your own space.

    Eclectic Decorating Rule #1: Keep Your Lines Clean
    "Furniture should come in basic forms-squares, rectangles and circles-the cleaner, the better," says Deborah.

    Deborah Wecselman


    Eclectic Decorating Rule #2: Mix It Up
    "Don't be afraid to mix patterns and prints," Deborah says. "By adding primary shaped furniture, it keeps the space 'clean' and allows for abstract adornments that will not create a 'busy' appearance."

    Deborah Wecselman


    Eclectic Decorating Rule #3: Add color
    It's no secret that we love color here, but Deborah advises a more concentrated approach. "Start with a room with neutrals like taupe, beige, cream, grey, black, white or brown, then add bold home accessories...from bright yellow paintings to royal blue vases, unexpected pops of color add personality to any space," she says.

    Deborah Wecselman


    To see more gorgeously eclectic interiors, visit Deborah Wecselman Designs.

     

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