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Shelterpop

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    In this week's Random Recast, we took a look at a few unexpected uses for egg cartons.

    Day 4: Egg Carton House

    egg-cartonsGoldenhen


    It's not coming to a development near you, but it's nice to look at isn't it? This art installation by the Australian studio Goldenhen turns egg cartons into ersatz bricks. A wry commentary on the dream of suburban homeownership, this piece is based on the Howard Arkley painting "Family Home: Suburban Exterior" (1993).

    Day 3: Egg Carton Chandelier

    egg-cartonsOtero Design Studio


    In this chandelier by Otero Design Studio, egg cartons are turned into a drum-style lampshade. Though inspiring, we figured out a way to DIY this one.

    Day 2: Egg Carton Flowers

    Intimate Weddings


    Create an everlasting bouquet with this simple craft idea. It's great for wedding or party centerpieces.

    Day 1: Egg Carton Seat

    egg-cartonsAndrew Wagner


    A trash day stack of egg cartons forms a surprisingly comfortable seat. And there's minimal steps to creating the stool: Just carve four "feet" from the bottom (for stability) and wrap with belts (optional).

     

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    Like any great room, a great garden needs to balance style and substance. Here, the spaces that do it right.

    The High Line park New YorkThe High Line in August. Photo: Marie Viljoen

    A park for every season...

    Despite some serious competition from parks to the south, north and even across the East River in Brooklyn, Manhattan's High Line is widely acknowledged to be the new jewel in New York's horticultural crown.

    Pictured above is the Chelsea Grasslands section of the elevated railroad. In a planting design conceived by Piet Oudolf, cultivated meadow grasses and perennials are mixed with native plants to create a sophisticated mosaic that remains true to the essence of the opportunistic weeds and grasses that used to spring from the gravel and abandoned tracks.

    Here, a masterful combination of grasses and perennials provides interest in every season. In August the splashing yellow of black-eyed susans, statuesque prairie dock and willow-leafed sunflowers dominate the color scheme while rich, rusty sneezeweeds in low mounds beside stands of purple broadleaf ironweed offset the bright daisies. Sporadic, lighter highlights wild quinine, which peaks in July, signal the turning season, while red switch grass gives an early hint of the fall to come. Form and texture as important as fleeting flowers, and the spiky orbs of Eryngium seed capsules are juxtaposed beside prairie dropseed whose airy, early stems of seedheads herald a sequence of grass bloom that peaks in early fall.

    For a full list of plants visit the Highline's August Bloom List and find more images of the stunning August Highline at 66 Square Feet.

     

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    One of everyone's least favorite places for cleaning is probably the bathtub. It's hard to reach all the corners, you have to bend over and scrub...in the end it seems more trouble than it's worth. But think about all the hair and grime build-up in it and you'll reconsider.

    An unexpected way to make sure all the dust and hair is removed is to use a hand-held vacuum on the bathtub when it's dry to suck up all the bits, or wipe it down with a dry microfiber towel. Do this before adding in any cleaning products. It will prep the tub for an easy clean.


    Have a cleaning tip to share? Let us know at Twitter.com/ShelterPop.

    Daily Clean-Up tipsChiot's Run, Flickr

     

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    Architectural Digest sits down with the HBO hit series production designer Chace Harlan who looks back on the greatest locations used on the show.

    The last season of Entourage is upon us and it almost seems unreal after all that we've been through with them. If you're a fan, then you know about all the hotspots and A-list venues that the crew frequented--from the gang's temporary crash pad at the Roosevelt hotel (which was actually a real home nearby) to the Frank Gehry-designed Walt Disney Concert Hall.

    And thanks to this exclusive interview with production designer Chace Harlan over at Architectural Digest, we've found out a few extra little-known details about some of the show's hottest spots. One insider bit: One of Vince's home is the actual residence of the hotelier Sam Nazarian. Head over to Architectural Digest to find out which one it is.

    Entourage Geoffrey's MalibuPhoto: Geoffrey's Malibu, Courtesy of Chace Harlan

     

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    The bougie designer talks to The Wall Street Journal about his likes and dislikes, cutting back on "stuff" and McDonald's.

    Interior designer Stephen Sills is not one who is out of touch with the times. The creative mastermind behind Manhattan's landmark residential building, the Apthorp, talks about the end of expensive mid-century modern furniture, cutting back on design "stuff" and his soft spot for a McDonald's filet of fish sandwich. Check out the rest of Sills' cravings and thoughts on design today at The Wall Street Journal.

    Stephen Sills The Wall Street JournalLeft: Stephen Sills. Right: His favorite French bar soap. Photos: Courtesy of The Wall Street Journal

     

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    This week, four designers offer their expertise on how to streamline your home to help you communicate with your loved ones better.

    This week as we look at how your home can help solve your problems we're exploring how it can help you communicate better with your friends and family. We reached out to the New York Design Center's new Access to Design designers to get their thoughts and tips on how your home can inspire you to be more creative in communicating with those you love. (You can also get great advice and find a designer at accesstodesign@nydc.com.)

    Tara Seawright NYDCCourtesy of Tara Seawright


    Tara Seawright of Tara Seawright Inc. recommends smart furniture placement.
    "The key for focusing on more intimate communication is to avoid distractions. I tend to avoid placing a television in the bedroom. I opt for a sensual vibe with a chenille rug, relaxing music and silk drapes."

    Robert Passal NYDCCourtesy of Robert Passal


    Robert Passal or Robert Passal Interior and Architectural Design believes it's in the ambiance.
    "Smaller, darker, moodier rooms tend to foster conversation better. Soothing music coupled with dimmed lighting is an easy way to get down to stimulating conversation."

    Michelle Slovak NYDCCourtesy of Michelle Slovak


    Michelle Slovak of Michelle Slovak Interior Design is all about a relaxing gathering spot.
    "Whenever possible, I like to use a banquette in lieu of the usual four chairs around a dining table--it definitely creates a more comfortable spot to gather friends for some sparkling conversation. Or, better yet, imagine enjoying a romantic, intimate dinner with your lover. A comfortable banquette or bench never fails to inspire your peeps to sit, talk, reconnect--and not text! Seriously."

    Jason Oliver Nixon John Loecke NYDCCourtesy of John Loecke Inc.


    Jason Oliver Nixon of John Loecke Inc. suggests kicking back with a few beverages.
    "How can my home make me communicate better? I ask my home the same question every night. And since our little maison is so high-strung and high-falutin, she gives me the cold shoulder when all I seek is a little together time and cuddling. But no, there will be no mea culpas on my part. Invariably I end up at the bar in our living room and then I feel better. And then I have another spot of the brown liquor and I start feeling a bit braver and then I frankly don't give two shakes if the damn house wants to speak to me later or not. 'I have a headache,' I say, 'and am not giving up the goods.' So short story long: Pull together a good bar and keep it well stocked. Who wants to talk so much anyhow? Especially to a house. Loose lips sink ships, not that I like boating, but it's still good advice."

    Gillian Rose NYDCCourtesy of Gillian Rose


    Gillian Rose of Gillian C. Rose Interior Design believes in striking the right balance of comfort.
    "By creating balance and harmony...all the rest is white noise."


    Looking for more tips on how to stay healthy indoors? Check out our previous Home Remedies on How To Get Creative and How To Be Productive.

     

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    We've learned what a mess says about you, but have you considered the impact of where that mess is located? Author and environmental psychologist Sally Augustin, PhD, sheds some light on this surprising revelation. (And yes, we've learned lots from this!)

    environmental-psychologyJoseph Cote, flickr




    Mess location: The entryway
    Chances are you are: Extroverted
    "A mess in an entryway that contains personalizing items [think knick-knacks, photos, art, etc.] communicates a need to clearly and immediately establish information about themselves to their visitor," Augustin says. "People with this sort of mess are also apt to be extroverted and interested in establishing a bond with visitors. Personalizing items also establish territory."
    What to do about it: Extroversion isn't a bad trait! But have you been welcoming so many people in your home that you don't have time to tend to your own needs? Then it's time to put "you" on your calendar. Make it a habit to clear up clothes, jackets, and other "drop off" items that you leave by the door when you get home and for when you are leaving. As much as you enjoy welcoming guests into your own home, your entryway should be equally welcoming upon visitor arrivals.

    Mess location: The living room
    Chances are you are: Tense
    "Cluttered spaces...generate tension for humans because our eyes continually review our environment. With lots of stuff around, that process becomes more arduous. In addition, since our possessions are extensions of us, lack of care for them could also indicate, potentially, a lack of self respect-but it may also indicate a toddler is present, money is in short supply, or other similar things."
    What to do about it: Since the living room area tends to be the cluster zone for your family, it's all a matter of finding space to hide the clutter. Utilize decorative storage bins and storage ottomans. Seeing a messy area will induce more stress and tension, so take that extra minute to keep things in allotted places. Then, recover from the visual tension by closing your eyes and listening to music.

    Mess location: The dining room
    Chances are you are: Avoidant/Shy
    "A mess can indicate that the space-owner wants to avoid this area, which they might want to do for a number of reasons-from negative experiences in dining rooms at an earlier time in their life (like getting grilled at the table when young about their day in school), to a more current issue, such as being on a perennial diet."
    What to do about it: It's time to bring in the storage benches...and work on reconnecting with friends. It doesn't have to be formal entertaining-a simple cup of coffee will do. Remember, avoiding the mess won't help your mind relax and overcoming shyness means sitting well in your own skin, so making sure that the dining table surface is cleared off and that non-dining related items--such as papers, magazines, mail, and the random pile of jackets--are not taking up space in the dining room will also help make tackling the mess, and life, easier.

    Mess location: The kitchen
    Chances are you are: Adventurous
    "Messes in this space that are due to things like unusual items...think rarely-used spices...or a cookbook for varying cuisines indicates openness to new experiences."
    What to do about it: Capitalizing on your interest in all things new and exciting is as simple as making sure spices and cookbooks are easily accessible. For the latter, use a step-style spice rack, which ensures that everything you need is in sight and in reach. And why not bring in a small bookshelf to store your culinary guides?

    Mess location: The bedroom...or bathroom
    Chances are you are: Feeling insecure
    "Bedrooms and bathrooms are the inner sanctums of our lives, the spaces where, to the extent they are private, we are most free to express who we really are. Therefore, messes composed of personalizing items here indicate a need by the people who control the space to remind themselves of who they are as a person."
    What to do about it: It's hard to feel secure when the last place you see before going to sleep (and the first thing you see in the morning) is a mess of magazines, books and clothes. Conversely, if grooming products and extra bathroom supplies are stumbling blocks in the morning, you won't leave the house feeling ready to tackle the world. For the bedroom, make use of under-bed storage with sliding storage containers or boxes. Limit books or magazines to one per person, then relocate the rest to a bookshelf in another area in your home. Or better yet, donate them. For the bathroom, throw out all the old cosmetics you never use and consider storing surplus supplies in a bathroom étagère that is sized to fit right where the toilet is.

     

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    Don't have time to browse all the online sample sales everyday? You're in luck: We searched them all and brought back the best.

    Editor's Pick:
    Devon and Clive wire pendant lamps by Jamie Young, $56-$59, MyHabit.

    Jamie Young wire pendant lampsCourtesy of MyHabit


    Modern mesh or wire pendant lamps can get pretty pricey, so we love these pretty, shapely pieces. These metal wire hanging pendant lamps have an artful elegance that really set them apart from run-of-the-mill hanging lights and they will definitely add visual intrigue above a contemporary dining table.

    Want to snap this up? Move quickly. Sale ends Sunday, 11am.

    Check back tomorrow for the next Daily Sampling!

     

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  • 08/16/11--01:57: Daily Clean-Up:
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    The bathroom, like the kitchen, often has limited counter space and under-sink storage. And ironically these are the two rooms that usually require the most storage space. For the bathroom, consider utilizing walls and the vertical space with mini-drawers or even an étagère.

    The key is to use affordable, simple, stackable storage solutions or fork out a little more for a standing shelf piece that can hold everything from your daily essentials to first aid supplies and toilet paper.


    Have a cleaning tip to share? Let us know at Twitter.com/ShelterPop.

    Daily Clean-Up tipsChiot's Run, Flickr

     

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    Spruce up your wall with a graphic print. Here's how to win one from the new West Elm and 20x200 art series along with a $100 e-certificate to shop at 20x200.


    West Elm and 20x200 Bert Teunissen art printCourtesy of West Elm and 20x200


    Last week we announced that West Elm and 20x200 have launched a new art collection of 10 limited-edition prints by various emerging artists. And we're excited to be giving away one of the collection's graphic black-and-white prints along with a $100 e-certificate to a winner to shop at 20x200. Scroll through to see how you can enter to win!


    Interested in winning? Here's how you enter:

    To enter click below to tweet and tell us what you love about art prints. Don't forget to follow @ShelterPop and add #SPArtGiveaway so we can find your tweet.

    Follow ShelterPop on Twitter

    o. If you're not a Twitter fanatic, leave a comment below!

    o. Your comment or tweet must be left before midnight on Monday, August 22nd and you may enter only once.

    o. 1 winner will be randomly selected to win a framed print of Atlanta22A by Bert Teunissen, a $100 e-certificate from 20x200, and a 16" x 14" frame from the 20x200 collection for West Elm.

    o. The contest is open to legal residents of the 50 United States, the District of Columbia and Canada (excluding Quebec) who are 18 and older.

    * Click here for complete Official Rules. Winners will be notified by email, so be sure to provide a valid email address!

     

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  • 08/16/11--05:35: Where I Write: Lisa Wingate
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    Take a peek inside the spaces where some of today's authors write, ponder, and procrastinate. This week: Dandelion Summer author Lisa Wingate's memorabilia-filled office.

    Where do I write?

    Among scraps of the past.

    I think all writers do. As a writer, you eventually find that the people you create, the places you thought were plucked from the ether are not so misty and ethereal, after all. They're really just a patchwork of people you've known and places you've been. They're sewn together with a fine, glistening thread of imagination, stitched and fitted and nipped, turned this way and that, their textures and colors creating a quilt of story.

    Somehow, when it's all over, the sharp edges blend together into patterns that are pleasing and beautiful, and you have the feeling that you've known these people before--that in some way or other you are these people. For me, every story is a blend of past and present, of fantasy and life, of the quirky and the divine. I guess that's why, over the years, I've ended up with a writer space that is a muddle of history, and mystery, and family.

    Lisa Wingate writer Courtesy of Lisa Wingate



    I like do-dads. There, I've admitted it. I know the modern way is to de-clutter, but I love old things-things that were useful, that were loved, that were treasured once. Things that have been passed down to me by someone I've loved.

    The flotsam in my office has stories. It whispers to me as I sit writing, or walk past, or stare at the walls, waiting for words to materialize. I look at the tiny metal ice skaters in the whatnot shelf, and my mind whispers, "Where were you before you ended up in a shoebox at that estate sale? How did you travel here from your maker's hands in France? Did you arrive on some long-ago Christmas morning in a crate with tiny trains and track, underneath the tree in a big house where such things could be afforded? Did you sail here on the Titanic, escape almost forgotten in the pocket of child's coat on that cold, tragic night? Did you come to Texas in the back of a covered wagon, on a train, in a carpetbag atop a stagecoach? What? What? Speak to me! Where is the child who loved you?"

    The furniture in my office has voices, too. I'm sure I need therapy. My little pub table is Writer Central for me. Typically, it's littered with stacks of to-do lists, notes about stories, research books, messy character studies torn from spiral notebooks. The antique dealer told me it came from an Irish pub. I don't know if that's true, but I like to think it is. Sometimes I imagine the lives trapped deep in the grain. What has the wood seen, first as a chestnut tree, then as lumber, then as a table in some shadowy corner? Did lovers kiss here? Did spies meet to plot their schemes? Did friends gather to toast to life and share stories of the Emerald Isle?

    That's writer nectar atop the table, by the way-chai tea in a hand-thrown mug sent to me by Elizabeth Weiler, a sweet friend I met after she put my first novel, Tending Roses, in her book about book clubs. I write for two publishers and work a lot. Chai tea with a little whipped cream on top (the chocolate variety in this photo) is one of those little bribes I offer myself when a nap or Dr. Phil tempt me in the afternoons. We make our own chai mix around here. You can find my mom's special recipe on my website on the "Lisa's Scrapbook" page under "Recipes", in case you need some writer nectar of your own.

    I have a strange fetish for old organizational furniture in my office. If I buy one more thing-with-tiny-drawers-in-it, my family will probably have me committed. I love card catalogs from library sales, my big roll top desk, oak file cabinets with heavy old drawers that are hard to open. The new ones with stainless steel sliders would work so much better, but they wouldn't have history. They'd lack the character of the graceful old forms cabinet that sits at the end of my row of bookshelves. The forms cabinet is a family heirloom of sorts. I found it covered in depression-era green paint and a patina of grease, in a warehouse belonging to my husband's
    granddaddy. The cabinet was filled with tools, nuts, and bolts. I knew I had to save it. It had so many drawers!

    Lisa Wingate writerCourtesy of Lisa Wingate


    I could never have imagined how beautiful the cabinet would be, refinished and sharing space with the massive oak bookshelves of my childhood. The forms cabinet has thirty-six drawers in all (there are eighty-one little drawers in my office, but who's counting). I don't know how the cabinet came to be in Grandaddy's warehouse and neither does he, but it's a great place to keep manuscripts and paperwork. I wonder at its story. Clues hide inside the drawers in the form of log sheets, affixed on the drawer bottoms at the time of manufacture. Someone with
    lovely handwriting used a fountain pen to make notations in the drawers from 1900 to 1925, off and on. I don't know what the notations, like the one in this photo, mean. I wonder about them sometimes.

    Who was A.L. Sweet? What did he do in 1907 that caused his name to end up in my forms cabinet? Did he buy something, sell something, borrow money? Get arrested? Start a business? Join the army? Pass away?

    Did his name fit him? Was he sweet? Was he the town baker, or the candy maker? Or was he a dastardly villain with a handlebar moustache, the type to cast helpless widows and orphans from the their farms in the dead of winter?

    Did the whole town turn out for his funeral-pay final respects as Mr. A.L. Sweet traveled on to the great by-and-by? Or was he buried alone, in the rain, with only the undertaker and the gravediggers to bid him adieu?

    This is where the crazy quilt of story begins-with a name, a glimpse, a notation in an unlikely place. With questions tumbling over questions, all arms and legs like children cartwheel racing down a hill. With a mist of wondering, with oddly-shaped shreds of reality, scraps of truth and fiction floating about. For me, storytelling is so much about snatching up what's already there, about the turning, and the trimming, and the fitting, and the stitching. That's why I like my busy writer space, with its clutter of found items and its myriad of nooks, cubbies, and drawers. There are dozens of stories here, hundreds perhaps, or thousands. Like the tale of A.L. Sweet.
    He'll find his way into a book sooner or later, as will the tiny metal figure skaters in their colorful coats and muffs, and the old Irish pub table.

    It's all fodder for another tale, and in the end, that's one of the great things about being a writer. The air is never quiet, because the things around you want to be heard. The spaces you inhabit, whether official writer-spaces or not, are filled with potential, crowded with nuggets of truth, and life, and experience, a story quilter's goldmine of scraps, just waiting to be pieced together.



    Lisa Wingate is a writer and inspirational speaker in central Texas, where she lives with her husband and two sons. She grew up in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and studied writing at Oklahoma State University. She was inspired to become a writer by a special first grade teacher. Her latest novel in the Blue Sky Hill series is Dandelion Summer. For more information about Lisa Wingate, visit her website at www.lisawingate.com.

     

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    A designer's cool, comfortable, and crafty knitted stools have caught our eye in a big way.


    Check out this cool designer feature from our friends at CasaSugar!


    h&m home


    Based out of London, artist Claire-Anne O'Brien has a talent for creating cool seating. Using knitting techniques rendered on a massive scale, this Royal College of Art graduate exaggerates the look of traditional knits by using large stitches for her furniture pieces.


    O'Brien was recently awarded the Future Makers Award from the Crafts Council of Ireland, and it's no secret why she attracted the council's attention. Her work is bold, ambitious, and striking. Inspired by elements of the knitted stitch, including rings and loops, Claire-Anne's sculpture-like knitted pieces are truly original. Take a closer look at her work!


    This sweet little stool has a bulbous look.


    The stools feature a mix of lambswool and sheep wool.


    I love the giant braided knit on this stool.


    See the rest of Claire-Anne's cool knitted stool designs over at CasaSugar!


    Also check out these stories!
    10 Surprising Art-Filled Cribs
    10 Stylish Room Dividers
    Vintage Camera Decor

     

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    Don't have time to browse all the online sample sales everyday? You're in luck: We searched them all and brought back the best.

    Editor's Pick:
    Baby Piggy bank from the Zhush, $35, Joss & Main.


    As the saying goes, no pain no gain. While it seems ironic to be dishing out some cash to stash away some, it always helps when there's a little bit of extra incentive. This gleaming silver piggy bank will do just that and motivate you to save those coins. It's a nice reminder to a bright start to savings, don't you think?

    Want to snap this up? Move quickly. Sale ends Saturday, 10am.

    Check back tomorrow for the next Daily Sampling!

     

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    While most bathrooms in homes have towel rods, it's actually a lot easier and cleaner to use towel hooks. Not only do towel racks have a tendency to quickly turn into messy hanging spots (most of us rarely neatly fold our bath towels to look nice on hooks) but folding wet towels doesn't let the moisture air out. And we all know what wet fabric smells like after a few days.

    Hooks not only allow for towels to air loosely, they can also make for an organized and neat towel-hanging system--three hooks in a row automatically makes hanging look strategic, neat, and organized...without the damp fabric smell.


    Have a cleaning tip to share? Let us know at Twitter.com/ShelterPop.

    Daily Clean-Up tipsChiot's Run, Flickr

     

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    Each week, bring a new bloom into your home and garden with our gardener's favorite floral find.


    Eupatorium dubeum "Little Joe". Photo: Marie Viljoen


    Beautiful Eupatorium dubium "Little Joe" is not diminutive by many standards: It reaches 3'-4'. But compared to Eupatorium fistulosum, which teeters on 10' stems, "Little Joe" is a more manageable choice for most gardens as it flourishes in either moist conditions, lots of sunshine or even partial shade. In Northern America, "Little Joe" usually grows naturally within 100 miles of the Atlantic coast near streams and wetlands. A late summer bloomer, it blossoms with wide lilac flower heads that lure bees and butterflies. It is hardy from Zones 4-9.

    Read more about joe pye weeds and other native plants with late summer flowers.

     

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    Before diving head-on into gardening and buying expensive tools, consider these must-have essentials.


    Check out this great story by our friends at Fox News!

    Fox News Home & Garden
    From gas-powered tillers to electric hedge trimmers, there's no shortage of power tools to help you maintain your garden. But while these tools can be helpful, you don't need a shed bursting with high-end gear to grow a vibrant garden. Instead, focus on the basics - these essential tools that every gardener should master before moving on to the more expensive gardening toys.

    Gardening tools essential cathyducky, Flickr


    Trowel and hand rake

    Before you can plant a garden, you first need to do a little digging. A trowel and hand rake are two essential tools for planting small seedlings, breaking up clumps of dirt and weeding between your plants.

    For bigger tasks, you're going to want to turn to a shovel and garden fork, the bigger siblings of the trowel and hand rake. Use these to loosen large patches of packed soil or dig holes for saplings.

    While you can certainly get cheap trowels, shovels and garden forks, spring for something made from stainless steel or cast aluminum. These are garden tools after all, and you don't want them rusting away. You also want to make sure that they are sturdy. you won't save any money in the long run by buying something that will bend in half at the first tough patch of dirt.


    To see what the other basic garden essential equipments are, head on over to Fox News!


    Also don't miss these interesting reads:
    How To Get Your Security Deposit Back
    5 Home Projects To Finish Before Labor Day
    14 Household Uses For Beer

     

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  • 08/17/11--07:50: Design Eye: B Brian Atwood
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    The shoe designer extraordinaire takes his latest boutique to a whole new level with a contemporary interior space featuring an amazing sculpture.
    design-eye


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    Don't have time to browse all the online sample sales everyday? You're in luck: We searched them all and brought back the best.

    Editor's Pick:
    Joseph Joseph worktop saver, $10, Gilt Home.

    Here's a bold dose of color that you can inject into your kitchen. This toughened glass Joseph Joseph worktop saver is not only dishwasher safe, it's also heat-resistant up to 536 degrees. On top of that, this worktop surface is odor and stain resistant, making it apt for any sort of food preparation. The final bonus? It's an affordable and easy color accent.

    Want to snap this up? Move quickly. Sale ends Saturday at noon.

    Check back tomorrow for the next Daily Sampling!

     

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    Acrylic bathtubs, which includes those beautiful clawfoot tubs, are more common in households than most people think. And there's a reason for it. Acrylic bathtubs hold heat well, aren't too heavy, and have a great polished finish.

    An easy and natural way to keep acrylic bathtubs clean and sleek is to make sure to clean them at last once a week. Lots of hot water paired with a mild soap is the key--we've found that dishwashing liquid works best. And always use a soft sponge, and never use any abrasive cleaning pads or products (check the labels, you don't want ones containing fine grit). And also never wax acrylic bathtubs as they're naturally shiny and meant to stay that way without extra polish.


    Have a cleaning tip to share? Let us know at Twitter.com/ShelterPop.

    Daily Clean-Up tipsChiot's Run, Flickr

     

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