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Shelterpop

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    Don't have time to browse all the online sample sales everyday? You're in luck: We searched them all and brought back the best.

    Editor's Pick: Belgian-inspired Rosemont Clara dining and armchair, $299 each, Rue La La.


    I've been dreaming of Belgian-style armchairs and dining chairs for my pint-size New York apartment for a long time now, so I was extra thrilled to discover these among today's finds. Handcrafted from oak with a natural finish and upholstered in vintage jacquard, these chairs are subtle in color but hard-to-miss in a room. Plus, the price is a steal!


    Want to snap this up? Move quickly. Sale ends Monday, 10am. Check back tomorrow for the next Daily Sampling!

     

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    The New York Times recently profiled parents who spend extravagantly on decadent playhouses for their children.

    "Childhood is a precious and finite thing ... And a special playhouse is not the sort of thing you can put off until the economy gets better," Barbara Butler, a builder whose houses sell for $54,000 on average, told the Times.

    And many of the subjects interviewed concur: One couple dropped nearly $248,000 on a treehouse and connected fortlike structure.

    The Times rounded up several companies that offer myriad fantastical constructions for kids. We've taken a closer look at some of the most over-the-top that are on offer.


    Lilliput Play Homes offers this "Grand Victorian" design for $19,999. Baby grand piano? Check. Handmade kitchen stove? Check. Skylight and bay window? Check, and check.


    Barbara Butler's "Rosefield Cottage" boasts a hand-carved and stained exterior, real glass windows, electricity and a fully furnished interior.



    Did we mention there's patio furniture?


    La Petite Maison
    's most popular model features a wrap-around porch and loft. The house itself presumably costs much more, but for $195 you can buy its architectural plans.


    Artistically inclined tots will appreciate the mid-century modern design of Smart Playhouse's "Illinois" model.


    And finally, this elaborate structure from Posh Tots consists of a lookout tower, rock climbing walls, a clubhouse, "fortress bridge" and slide. The price? $122,730.

     

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    The First Lady is the first presidential wife to grace the magazine's cover.

    The August 2011 issue of Better Homes and Gardens is making history. First Lady Michelle Obama is not only the first public figure to appear on the magazine's cover in more than 40 years, she's also the only presidential wife to do so.

    The story spotlights Mrs. Obama's healthy eating and living incentives, and features a 9-page spread about a White House picnic with school children from the local area that she hosted at the presidential mansion. All the fruits and vegetables are grown, of course, at Mrs. Obama's gardens at the White House.

    Scroll through to see photos from the fun afternoon.

    Michelle Obama Better Homes and GardensPublished with permission, Meredith Corporation(C), Better Homes and Gardens Magazine (R), August 2011. Photography by Melanie Acevedo

    Michelle Obama Better Homes and GardensPublished with permission, Meredith Corporation(C), Better Homes and Gardens Magazine (R), August 2011. Photography by Melanie Acevedo

    We love that the pretty white napkins reiterate the healthy foods theme with pictures of fruits and vegetables.

    Michelle Obama Better Homes and GardensPublished with permission, Meredith Corporation(C), Better Homes and Gardens Magazine (R), August 2011. Photography by Melanie Acevedo

    And the vegetable centerpieces and the mini glass bottles used for orange juice are simply adorable.

     

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    We love the StyleList's "It Happened Last Night." We love decor. So why not put them together in a shoppable, fashion-fueled room?

    This Weekend's Pick: Emma Stone

    The young starlet appeared at the recent "Friends With Benefits" premiere dressed in sassy red and a hot pink skirt. We love the bow detail on the skirt and the hint of red coming from her Louboutins. Girly yet feminine, her oufit's fiery hues inspired us to piece together a sexy boudoir full of purples, reds, and pinks.


    Emma Stone RoomPhoto by Stephen Lovekin/Getty Images




    And you can get the look in your home with these products:

    Clockwise from top left:
    Sonia chair, $2,000, Horchow.
    Red Murano-glass chandelier, $2,940, Design Within Reach.
    Red lacquer cubes, $150-$350, Jonathan Adler.
    Silk Dupioni pillows, $48 each, ABC Carpet & Home.


    And if you haven't yet, head over to see this week's Well-Suited Room inspired by our favorite best dressed men.

     

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    You've seen our Fashionable Room column where we look to some of the best-dressed starlets for decor inspiration. Now we're turning to the best-groomed men for some pointers.

    This Weekend's Pick: Adrian Grenier

    The way-too-good-looking Entourage star walked down the red carpet at the show's final season 8 premiere donning a navy suit matched with a bright purple striped tie and light-brown leather shoes. Naturally Adrian's ensemble had us pondering the one and only most fitting type of living space for him: A bachelor pad.


    Adrian Grenier Room Entourage Season 8 Final PremierePaul Zimmerman/WireImage


    And you can get the look in your home with these products:

    Clockwise from top left:
    Colton chandelier by Lauren Ralph Lauren, $735, Circa Lighting.
    Accordion hand-carved wood stool, $199, Wisteria.
    Crispin Grape pillow, $35, Crate & Barrel.
    Milo sofa, $4,998, Anthropologie.

     

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    Talk is (literally) blowing up around Bojaki, a new line of inflatable housewares.

    Industrial designer Jy Yeon Suh has been making heads turn in the design world recently with his new Bojaki collection of flat-pack, foldable fabric home furnishings that can be inflated for use.

    Every bit novel? Certainly so. While the innovative line's trays, vases, stools, and light fixtures look puffy from afar, they're sturdy and firm to the touch up close. So no worries about these pieces collapsing on you (possible punctures aside.) Nonetheless we're highly intrigued for easy-to-transport and out-of-the-box designs for the home.

    Scroll through and chime in on the discussion by letting us know what you think: Is the Bojaki collection super crazy, super sexy, or super cool?

    Bojaki inflatable housewares jy yeon suhCourtesy of Bojaki


    Bojaki inflatable housewares jy yeon suhCourtesy of Bojaki


    Bojaki inflatable housewares jy yeon suhCourtesy of Bojaki


    Bojaki inflatable housewares jy yeon suhCourtesy of Bojaki

     

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    From sudsy water to chopping vegetable, the kitchen counter is one of the surfaces in the home that is most used for a number of different purposes. Therefore keeping it spic and span is crucial for sanitary reasons, and it's simple to do so.

    Unless the counter was used to prepare raw meats, there's no need to scrub the entire surface every night. Just make sure to wipe it down with disinfecting wipes to kill any germs. It's simple, quick, and leaves you more time to kick back and relax.


    Have a cleaning tip to share? Let us know at Twitter.com/ShelterPop.

    Getty; Corbis

     

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    This week four designers offer insight on how your home can help you stay healthy.

    As we continue our quest to find out how your home can help solve your problems we're exploring how it can help you stay healthy. We reached out to the New York Design Center's new Access to Design designers to get their thoughts and tips on how your home can inspire you to get more creative. (You can also get great advice and find a designer at accesstodesign@nydc.com.)

    how-to-stay-healthyTony Calarco


    Evelyn Benatar of New York Interior Design is all about an inviting kitchen and home-cooked meals.
    "One of my clients recently shared her feelings about her new kitchen with me. She said that since her new kitchen has been installed, every morning when she comes down the stairs it instantly improves her mood. It also has made an impact on the way she and her husband are preparing meals. In the past her husband was the main chef, but now they enjoy evenings preparing meals together. They have taken a new, healthier approach to cooking. They are cooking at home more often and they have decided to integrate natural and organic foods into their new lifestyle."

    how-to-stay-healthyCourtesy of Laura Kirar


    Laura Kirar of Tru Design recommends taking a lot of time to relax and decompress.
    "Let your home be a sanctuary from everyday stresses by creating a restful, calming space like this serene master bathroom. I stay healthy by making time to reconnect with myself on a daily basis."

    Glenn Lawson of Glenn Lawson Inc. says to keep the pantry stocked.
    "Be sure to stock up on delicious & nutritious foods--particularly important during extreme weather spells. Tempt yourself to stay indoors. You may wish to stay inside in your air-conditioned space on your time off during that heat wave, and how nice it is when you open your fridge there is fresh fruits and vegetables to feed on as well as perhaps some cheeses and sandwich goodies. Also stock up on some dry goods such as bread, crackers and pretzels in your pantry. You can stay in and stay healthy! No need to trek out and risk heat exhaustion. The same can be said for those freezing and below-freezing winter spells. Who wants to trudge through the wind and the snow? Keep some fixings in the house--hot chocolate, tea, coffee...maybe even a couple of sweets. Don't risk that cold or flu; hunker down, find your favorite chair and ottoman and get friendly with a book or your latest Netflix or the New York Times. Take the time to enjoy that room you designed and make your home your haven and you'll stay healthy in your clement environment!"


    how-to-stay-healthyAcademy armoire: Courtesy of Hickory Chair through NYDC



    And Drew McGukin of Drew McGukin Interiors urges you to let in a lot of sunlight.
    "The first step to a healthy home is clean, organized spaces. Next is to add natural light. Create windows! The brighter and cleaner a space can live, the healthier and happier those living in and visiting the space will feel. I love this armoire for some added 'health' in the closet expanding and organization departments. The mirrored doors are a great stand-in for windows in a small bedroom or a charmless space; they can beautifully reflect adjacent light!"


    Looking for more tips on how to stay healthy indoors? Check out our previous Home Remedies on How To Wake Up Early and How Your Home Can Help You Look Younger.

     

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    Whether it's your Blackberry or non-stop work talk, work is work and home is home. We spoke with former House & Garden magazine editor Dominique Browning about how to unplug and keep work at bay and out of your personal life.

    Dominique Browning rid-work-baggage-from-home-lifeLeft: davesag, Flickr. Right: Scissor.Studio, Flickr


    More and more in the digital age with the plethora of compact laptops, hand-held phones/computers, and eReaders in the market, it's as if there's no escape from the office even when you're not there. We'll be the first to admit that we're guilty on every front when it comes to bringing work into our living space. That prompted us to dig a little for ways to clean our work physically (and mentally) out of our home lives.

    We spoke with Dominique Browning, former House & Garden magazine editor and author of Slow Love, a soulful and thought-provoking autobiography about her journey to blocking out work and reconnecting with herself. Scroll down for our Q&A with Dominique along with tips that we've been implementing since speaking with her.

    Dominique Browning rid-work-baggage-from-home-lifePortrait: Frances Palmer


    Are there rooms in the home where work should not be allowed?
    Absolutely. First, work should never be allowed in the bedroom. If you wake up looking at your desk and go to sleep with piles of paper and notes and computers blinking around your head, you'll never clear up the mental space you need to work with focus and clarity. After that, avoid work in the kitchen, for the obvious reasons: Peanut butter on keyboard, wine on eReaders, etc.

    For those who have home offices and work material tends to get everywhere, what would you recommend?
    I'm not strict or judgmental about material getting everywhere. Some people have to have that sort of "mess" in order to think straight. But you do need periodic clean up. Otherwise, put everything in baskets and pile them up on shelves or in a neat row under the desk with large labels so you know where things are. But don't let it get out of hand.

    A clean home often means a healthy home, but it doesn't necessarily mean it's work-free. What are decorating tricks that can help keep work out of the back of our minds?
    Make sure your space is lovely for you to be in and that it energizes or calms you as you need it to. Most important, make sure you are comfortable. Sounds obvious but you'd be surprised how often people don't even consider the height of their chair or the work surface area of their desk. Make sure you have something that gives you a middle distance focus--something you can "fall into" when you look up from your computer--a view of your garden, mountaintops in the distance, skyscrapers. Or the simplest way: Hang a poster or a landscape painting that gives your eyes another focus.


    What we've learned from Dominique and what we've been doing since.

    1. Limit Work Talk. Whether you live with your family or roommates, allot 10 minutes of work talk in the living area right when you get home. Get everything out of your system then and put a cap on it for the rest of your evening.

    2. Set Up Email Rules. If you're the type that's chained to their cell phone and email inbox, set strict rules for yourself to not check it at home. I've been feeling more refreshed recently by keeping my phone in my work bag on silent at dinnertime and when I'm with friends at home.

    3. Keep Work Out Of Sight. It's important to organize your work material and documents so that they're out of sight in your home and on your personal computer screen. Leave your bag in the closet by the entry and keep your phone on silent on a table. I've been hiding my work documents in a folder on my laptop.


    If you're still feeling work-minded but burned out, see our roundup of tips on How Your Home Can Help You Destress.

     

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    Design Eye is a look at the inspiring things seen, heard, and talked about in the world of design.

    For today's Design Eye, we've spotted a handful of off-beat home pieces designed by Martin Margiela with L'Atelier d'Exercices on Net-A-Porter. Our favorites: Half-spectacle acetate magnifying glass ($85), Trompe l'oeil door adhesive print ($460), and a goose-feather pen ($60).


     

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    Don't have time to browse all the online sample sales everyday? You're in luck: We searched them all and brought back the best.

    Editor's Pick: Cement herb plant pots and mini cement plant pots by Barreveld, $9/set of 3 One Kings Lane.


    I've got my eye on these small rough-hewn cement plant pots, which have a natural rustic look and undeniable charm. Grow herbs or bright daisies in these adorable plant pots and place them by a window or on top of a table; they're sure to instantly enliven a room, indoors or out.


    Want to snap this up? Move quickly. Sale ends Thursday, 11am. Check back tomorrow for the next Daily Sampling!

     

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    It may seem more trouble than it's worth to teach your kids about cleaning and how to do it right, but you might be pleasantly surprised at the results.

    Although it'll take time and patience on your part, it will all pay off in the end. Show them how to do things little by little, from wiping down tables to tying the trash. It may seem unrealistic, but the younger your kids are the more likely they'll be willing to participate and help. As a result, they'll be more prepared to help out in the coming years and you'll have it that much easier.


    Have a cleaning tip to share? Let us know at Twitter.com/ShelterPop.

    Getty; Corbis

     

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    Design Eye is a look at the inspiring things seen, heard, and talked about in the world of design.

    Eva Zeisel, the 104-year-old designer renowned for her sculptural ceramic tableware, is today's Design Eye spotlight. Zeisel--who continues to design for companies such as Design Within Reach and KleinReid--retains her sharp wit as evidenced by her recent interview with The Wall Street Journal.

    Here, two of our favorite Zeisel ceramic pieces: Classic Century sauce boat, $48, by Crate & Barrel, and Granit salt-and-pepper shakers, $38, by Design Within Reach.

    Eva Zeisel ceramicsSauce boat: Crate & Barrel; Shakers: Design Within Reach

     

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  • 07/26/11--07:14: Where I Write: Karen White
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    Our favorite authors give us a peek into the space where they write, research and yes, procrastinate. Today, The Beach Trees author Karen White invites us into her cozy sitting room.

    I'm a creature of habit. I grocery shop once a week on Sunday. I change and wash linens each Monday, and do the household laundry on Thursdays. Each day, after sending my son off to school, I write for 1 ½ hours before I allow myself to eat breakfast. Okay. So maybe "creature of habit" isn't strong enough. Maybe "borderline anal-retentive?"

    author karen whiteCourtesy of Karen White


    I have my reasons. I've published fourteen novels in ten years while raising two children, a dog, taking care of a house and all that entails, while being married to a man who travels for most of the week. It was either control the chaos and overwhelming number of tasks to be done, or let them bury me. I thought it easier to make shopping lists based on the floor plan of my local grocery store and the path I always take through it on my shopping trips.

    How does this relate to my work and my workspace? As it turns out, not at all! As organized and efficient as I am in other aspects of my life, I'm ridiculously not when it comes to my writing process and the space(s) in which I choose to do it. Compared to the Karen White/ mom/housewife, the Karen White/author is practically a hippie. A free-spirited flower child, if you will (except I don't own a pair of Birkenstocks or long gauze skirts).

    I don't outline, I research while I write when I discover I need to know more, and my synopses that I struggle to write for my long-suffering editor only bear a passing resemblance to the end product. Besides my morning-time writing, the rest of my day is regulated by my other life and I squeeze in writing time when I can.

    When I typed out my first book in the late nineties it was in a home office with dark wood desk and credenza and the clunky PC perched on a side table complete with fat monitor and dial-up modem. As my children got older and I became their personal chauffeur, I spent a lot of time at horse barns and practice fields. My mind was always going on my stories, but I had so little computer time that it took forever to get anything written. When my husband got a new laptop, I inherited his old one and voila-a new world was opened to me.

    author karen whiteCourtesy of Karen White


    My first real writing space was the inside of a 2004 Volvo SUV. I wrote the largest part of three novels in the confines of the cream interior (liberally scented with the aromas of hay and athletic socks). I actually found I was a lot more productive when not in an office. With the seat reclined all the way, I was comfortable-almost like being in bed-and the writing never felt like work. However, being chronically sleep-deprived, I did find myself doing a lot of unintentional napping. A job hazard, I guess.

    Because I was so used to writing in a car, I found myself enjoying the long-distance trips for holidays and vacations and not just because I had an excuse to make my husband do all the driving. With the kids happily involved in watching movies or reading in the back seat, I was free from laundry, errands, and email to simply write.

    When we moved across town six years ago, I decided it was time to find a house with more than just office space; I wanted a writing space. Yes, my husband was part of the purchasing decision, but since I spend more time in the house than he does so I figured I'd have more input (he still got his cigar-smoking porch). In the end, we found a house with not just one, but two places where I allow my creative juices to flow freely.

    I do have an official office on the first floor with wall-to-ceiling bookcases for all of my research books. I have a desk (a new purchase-not the old cherry-wood banker's desk that I started out with) and pretty yet functional furniture, and mementoes of my writing career sprinkled liberally around the room and walls. This is where I do the business side of writing---website, Facebook, fan mail and everything else. And since my publisher went all-digital for the editing process, this is where I do my final editing. I have two large windows that overlook the large hill of our back yard and the woods and pasture that lie behind it. It's very serene and beautiful, but I can't write in it. Maybe it's the chair and the way I have to sit up straight. Or maybe sitting in an office seems like too much work.

    author karen whiteCourtesy of Karen White


    When the weather is fine (in Atlanta that means in the spring/fall AFTER the pollen coats everything with a thick layer of yellow and BEFORE the heat of summer/chill of winter descends) you'll find me on the back screen porch that gives me the same view as the office, but I also get to hear the birds in the bird feeder and watch fat bumble bees and wasps trying to enter my little sanctuary from my perch on a low Adirondack chair. I have to put up with the lingering odor of cigar smoke, but I'm currently working on redecorating the space to make it more writer-friendly. Please don't mention this to my husband as I certainly haven't.

    But my favorite place to write is in the sitting room upstairs off of my bedroom. It's a perfect setup-allowing me to roll right out of bed and into my writing chair on days my son doesn't go to school. The dog doesn't get up early for anything so I can sit in my pajamas and write until he's ready. I have a little wet bar with my coffee maker (it has a timer so I always have hot coffee when I wake up) and a little fridge filled with my creamer and my little addiction: Diet Dr. Pepper. Nobody else in my family drinks this, so I'm free to have my own hoard right up there in my sitting room.

    I have two large bookshelves filled with favorite books and photographs, and a fireplace that goes on at the flip of a switch when the weather is cool. To the left of my chair is a small bookcase where I keep my research books that relate to my current work in process. When I finished The Beach Trees, all of my books about hurricanes, the Gulf Coast and New Orleans were moved to their section (yes, I have sections on my bookcases) down in my office to make room for all of my Charleston books as I work on the third book in my Charleston-based series.
    However, the most important part of my writing space is my Velcro dog, Quincy. Since he joined our family nearly five years ago, he has been glued to my side, bless his furry little heart. He insists on sitting next to me when I write and I actually had to buy a wider chair when he got bigger so we could both fit (yes, it was just him getting bigger I'm sure). He's been at my side for so many books now that I'm not sure if I could write one without him. I've even included him in several of my books. It was the least I could do. My husband has suggested moving the washer and dryer into my sitting room to make my workday more efficient, but for some reason I've managed to resist so far.

    I'm at the moment sitting at the airport in Charlotte, North Carolina writing this on my laptop, and I've been working on my book as well while flying on various legs of my book tour. I guess this means that while a writing space that is creative and comfortable is important and desirable for a writer, a deadline is what really dictates where I choose to write. But that won't stop me from angling for a beach house to stimulate my creativity. I might even accept a washer and dryer in my space in exchange for the sound of the ocean. Hey, it could happen.


    author karen whiteCourtesy of Karen White



    Karen White is the national bestselling author of On Folly Beach and thirteen other novels. Her most recent work, a moving tale about the South, family, and courage entitled The Beach Trees, was released this May. Karen lives in Atlanta. Visit her online at karen-white.com.

     

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    Newly single, will Kristin Cavallari be staying put in her West Hollywood home? With a lush courtyard and a state-of-the-art cook's kitchen, we say why not Kristin.

    Kristin Cavallari West Holllywood HomeThe living room of Kristin Cavallari's WeHo home. Photo: Rose and Chang / Prudential CA-Beverly Hills.

    Kristin Cavallari of reality-TV fame (Laguna Beach: The Real Orange County, The Hills) is newly single we've heard. Her now ex-fiancé, NFL Star Jay Cutler, broke off the engagement just a few days ago. We're guessing this means Kristin will be staying put for a while at her 1920s Spanish-style home in West Hollywood that we saw her buy just over a year ago.


    Kristin Cavallari West Holllywood HomePerfect Privacy. Photo: Rose and Chang / Prudential CA-Beverly Hills.


    The hedge-surrounded house is 1,400-square-feet large and features two bedrooms and two baths.

    Kristin Cavallari West Holllywood HomeEntryway. Photo: Rose and Chang / Prudential CA-Beverly Hills.

    The façade and front entrance is hidden behind crawling vines.

    Kristin Cavallari West Holllywood HomeThe sleek kitchen. Photo: Rose and Chang / Prudential CA-Beverly Hills.

    Subway tile backsplash and stainless-steel appliances in the kitchen.

    Kristin Cavallari West Holllywood HomeThe casual chic bedroom and high-style bathroom. Photo: Rose and Chang / Prudential CA-Beverly Hills.


    Cavallari's bedroom is located at the back of the house to ensure privacy, and the master bath has a mosaic-tile shower floor with Greek key patterns.

    To see the rest of Kristin's Havana-style retreat, take the full tour here.

     

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    Smart office supplies and organizing tips that ensure your home office is in mess-free.

    Check out this awesome story from our friends at Real Simple!



    Clever products and space-saving strategies to help you declutter your space.

    easy home office organizingTypeFiend, Flickr


    Binder Clips, Keyboards, Wire Organizers, Rolodexes

    1. If you tend to make piles of papers, use PileSmart binder clips―equipped with erasable labels―to fasten papers together by category and quickly find what you need.
    To buy: $4 for a pack of 6, amazon.com.

    2. The top of the myKeyO keyboard lifts up to reveal storage for desk doodads, like pushpins.
    To buy: $30, keyboardorganizer.com.

    3. Conceal excess wires by coiling them inside the cute and discreet rubberized Cable Turtle.
    To buy: $7 to $14, containerstore.com.

    4. Rolodexes aren't just for business contacts. Use them for recipes, website log-ons, and passwords.

    Desk Organizers, Labels

    5. An adjustable desk organizer lets you sort mail by category (bills to pay, bills to file).

    6. Magnetic Erasable Labels attach easily to metal shelving, boxes, and bins.
    To buy: $11 for five, containerstore.com.

    7. Create a hierarchy system for e-mail folders by using an A in front of each label for most-used folders and a Z for those used least.

    8. Designate one day of each year to buy birthday cards for friends and family so you'll never have to do a last-minute drugstore run.


    For more ways to straighten up your home office, head over to Real Simple.

    And check out more home improvement stories like:
    40 Decorating Tips For Your Living Room
    Home Upgrades That Pay Off
    Desk Chairs That Really Do The Job

     

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    Don't have time to browse all the online sample sales everyday? You're in luck: We searched them all and brought back the best.

    Editor's Pick: White and Black Cake ceramic wall clocks by IDEA International, $33 each, Fab.com.



    There's something bohemian yet Gothic about these ceramic wall clocks. We love the ornate hands, and the lacy frame brings to mind the intricate cutouts found on doilies. We see one--or even a pair of them--hanging above a doorway in the living room or on a kitchen wall.


    Want to snap this up? Move quickly. Sale ends Friday, 10am. Check back tomorrow for the next Daily Sampling!

     

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    We've all been stuck with a piece of clothing that we can't return because we misplaced the receipt, and we know it's a big hassle, but the time and meticulous energy you spend organizing and filing your receipts will pay off in these situations. And if you're self-employed, staying on top of your receipts is naturally even all the more important for taxes.

    There are a few ways to handle receipts:

    1. Put them in a sturdy envelope that's separated and labeled by month, and tack it in a spot that you visit every day (ie. back of a closet door, the wall next to your desk).

    2. Place a small box with a lid on your desk, next to the entrance, or on your bedside table so that they're safely stashed away in one place.

    3. Keep an envelope and a paper clip with you in your work bag so that when you're out you automatically group your receipts in one place that's not the bottom of your bag or your back pocket. Then when you get home, you can stash them away accordingly with the rest.


    Have a cleaning tip to share? Let us know at Twitter.com/ShelterPop.

    Getty; Corbis

     

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    Each week, bring something new to your garden/windowsill/favorite vase -- and impress your friends with your ahead-of-the-curve picks.


    oregano kent beautyOreganum "Kent Beauty". Photo: Marie Viljoen


    There's oregano and then there's oregano...

    Oreganum "Kent Beauty" is a hybrid ornamental oregano, a cross between O. rotundifolium and O. scabrum. Its silvery-blue and lime leaf bracts are tinged with pink and its flowers fade to deep purple. "Kent Beauty" is an arresting perennial for a hot, sunny spot with exceptionally good drainage, and it works well in pots. The only thing this fragrant plant detests is wet feet. Hardy from zones 6-9, it can be grown as an annual in colder climes.

    Previous Plant Picks:

    Repeat-blooming rose
    B
    ayberry, the native herb
    E
    dible ornamental: white currants
    P
    erfect fruit: strawberries

     

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  • 07/27/11--05:06: Boutique Of The Week: deKor
  • Filed under: ,

    Don't let yourself fall into a shopping rut. Instead, explore some of the best boutiques around the country. This week: DeKor, 2145 West Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA.

    Isabella Dahlin, an interior designer and the owner of deKor, opened this charming shop filled with eclectic Scandinavian home finds back in June. After getting her degree from the Otis College of Art and Design and a stint with the well-known interior designer David Phoenix, she set off on her own and deKor was founded. Scroll down for our Q&A with Isabelle and for peeks inside her cozy new store.


    1. What was the inspiration for this store?
    As an interior designer, I am constantly sourcing furniture and art for my clients. I've seen so many amazing pieces that I decided to open a store in which I could share all these wonderful and unique finds! Growing up in Sweden I was always surrounded by cutting-edge design and shops full of beautiful one of a kind treasures.


    2. Are there any pieces that are unique to your store?
    I love the made-to-order reclaimed wood swing! My mission is to get everyone to have a swing inside their house! If you are stressed out, in a bad mood, or just hanging out with friends it truly makes you happy when you sit on a swing. Trust me!

    Bethany Nauert


    3. What's been most popular with visitors at the store?
    The swings and the custom-made metal-and-wood tables as well as the charming, one-of-a-kind accent pieces that really define the style of deKor.

    4. What keeps visitors coming back?
    People return to the shop to primarily to see the new influx of unique pieces I source on a weekly basis.

    5. Do you have a favorite item in this store?
    It's so hard to choose a favorite among so many wonderful things, but if I had to, aside from the swings, I'd say the textile art by my mother, the Swedish artist Isa Dahlin. These pieces are woven in linen (occasionally in sisal) and paper yarn. I find these wall hangings extraordinary not only because they are beautiful, but alsobecause they are made by my mother.


    6. What do you like most about this store?
    For deKor, I wanted more than a store--I wanted to create a warm inviting environment. A place to talk; connect. A place where you would come and linger. It does feel like a home!

    7. Fun Fact:
    I'm not so shabby as a potter, and I have three chickens in my back yard that I named after my cackling girlfriends.


    On Shelterpop's wishlist: Olive oil hand-blown glass bottles, $45 each; dekorla.com.



     

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